PictureStanley and Stanley Herbert Daines during WWI.
My husband’s family has a long line of military service. As a surprise Christmas present, I created a shadow box
commemorating his grandfather, Stanley Herbert Daines. 

A shadow box is an opportunity to tell a
bit of a story about someone’s life. It’s also one way to display memorabilia  that isn’t just photographs. I still recall the images of ancestors from around the house when I was growing up but it didn’t engage me or give me any ideas about the person in the photo.

5 Tips for creating your shadow box
  1. Before you purchase the shadow box, gather everything together and try different layouts on your table. This way you'll get a good idea of the dimensions that will best suit your project.
  2. Decide how you will set the items into your display. Consider glue, thread, adhesive tape, or dimensional adhesives (3-D effect). Whichever you choose, use archival quality materials so the items won't get damaged. In the case of photographs, you could use a copy.
  3. Set items at different depths within the shadow box add to add more visual interest. If some items have a backing (pins or buttons, for example), insert Styrofoam behind the fabric or paper. Make small slices in the fabric to allow the backing through so the fabric doesn't pull.
  4.  Before you put it all together on the back board, MAKE SURE it is facing up! I made this mistake and it was a pain to re-set everything.
  5. Carefully clean the frame and glass to remove dust and debris and make sure it's dry before you put it all together.

In the shadow box I created, I used a heavy fabric over slim Styrofoam and a combination of dimensional adhesives, thread and glue to hold everything together. The photo is set onto contrasting colours of card stock paper that is raised from the background fabric using dimensional adhesive; the rope is threaded on in a co-ordinating colour of thread and I sewed all of the buttons on to the fabric, too, as well as setting them into the Styrofoam. The pins were probably the easiest because they got pinned to the fabric. That said, it was a bit fussy to get everything aligned!
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This was my first layout attempt with one fabric option. There is a spot where I was going to include the details of his military career.
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A sample. This is from Pinterest, citing Bradley's Art and Frame.com
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Finished project on a shelf in my husband's home office. His family's military service is something he's proud of.
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Another sample. This is also from Pinterest, citing thingsorganizedneatly.tumblr.com
Military Collection
 
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Why? Why would I need to do all that typing when I’ve got all this paper? That
might be the question you’re asking yourself. The answer is pretty simple when
you’re considering how to share your bounty with others. Having your information
stored electronically makes it so easy to share. There are other reasons, too,
not the least of which is ease of use and the organizational benefits, but I’m
concentrating on why it’s so handy for sharing.

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Once your information is stored electronically, there is so much you can do with
it to share with others. I think the most common thing that people think of is
charts of family trees. Most of us have seen the tree that starts with a single
name at the top or bottom of the page and then branch out to the parents,
grandparents, etc, etc. While these can be really lovely compositions, the
amount of information included generally relates to how much room there is on
the page. Depending on the genealogy software you use, these can be created
right at your computer. From there, you can print the chart or send it out
electronically to your family. I created a 6’x4’ chart for a client here in
Calgary and took it to a local printing company. The cost was very reasonable
and we were all thrilled with how it turned out.

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You can also include images in your databases which is truly amazing. If you
choose, you could include images of the people on your tree. If you’re not
printing out a family tree, maybe you want to create a report about a person and
his or her descendants, including the details
of their lives and pictures
accrued during their lifetimes. Once this information is in your database, the
options for creating and sharing are profound.

PictureAn iPad showing a Heredis screen shot.
Another way to share is using Apps available for your iPhone, iPad or tablet,
etc. I’ve tried 2 so far. GedView,
which costs about $5 ($3.99 US when I
last checked) and Heredis, which is free.

I like them
both. I love the fact that I can pop my iPad in my purse and be able to head
over to Mom’s to show here what I’ve found. A great side-benefit of the visit is
that quite often it jogs her memory and I hear all these stories. That leads me
into a whole new blog about LiveScribe, but I’ll save that for another day!
 
A final note... Once you have added your information into your database, it
can serve as a back-up for your paper
records. Of course, as with anything
stored electronically, remember to back up your work and store the back-up
off-site.

 
One way to share our family history stories is to actually tell the story of a person's life. Sir Cecil Edward Denny, Baronet was the subject of a research project for a client of mine. His story really touched me and I try to share it when I can. While he isn't part of my family, he is part of someone's.
PictureCourtesy of the RCMP Museum and Archives in Regina, SK. 1981.58.2
I love this photo of Sir Cecil Edward Denny. It reminds me so much of my grandfather, Emerson James White who used to tell us the most amazing stories, some of which may actually have some truth to them!

A little further down the page is a copy of an article I wrote that describes Denny's life.

Denny's life is recorded in a variety of places. The details were gathered from a variety of resources including: the RCMP Museum (Regina); the Glenbow Archives (Calgary); Library and Archives Canada (Ottawa); and an online resource called Newspaperarchives.com.
The article below was written by me for the journal, The Chinook, of the Alberta Family Histories Society here in Calgary.